« Aprons | Main | The Couture Process »

November 13, 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a01156f47abbe970c01287596f18d970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Azzedine Alaia:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

mia

wow love this blog and like the dress rokin

Becky D

That's craftsmanship! Beautiful. Wish I had the curves to pull off something like this.

Rachel

I've always thought that this dress would "read" much better on a human body than it does on the dress form. So glad you were both able to see past the blocky dress form to appreciate the dress!

elle

how could anyone accuse Alaia of "parodying the female body"? What does that make Jean Paul Gaultier?

I had always wondered how he produces his knit dresses. The ones I've seen at Galeries Lafayette look like the knit fabrics were custom-made for his designs (which would explain the price-tag). Like this dress for example, the inside looks so clean it's almost wearable.

btw, "Gift of Nancy Riegelman" - author of 9 heads?

Rachel

Elle,

The charge of parody was related to his extreme accentuation of the female form. To quote from the relevant article, "He believes his designs enhance a woman's femininity, but too often he seems to indulge in parody." (Bernadine Morris, NYT, April 1, 1986). My sense of the accusation is that Morris felt that his "enhancement" of a woman's feminine charms reduced women to a caricature consisting solely of breasts, hips, and buttocks.
Gaultier's emphasis on femininity has always seemed much more playful to me and not so much about being dead sexy.

Yes, the same Nancy Riegelman.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.