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November 20, 2009

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Katrina Andrews

Oh wow; the straps on this dress are just awesome. I've done some similar criss-crossing in some gowns I've made in the past, but they didn't look this cool!

One question though...I'm assuming the dress has a side zip on the side away from the camera? Or perhaps since it's bias cut, the wearer could just wriggle into it?

Ingrid Mida

What beautiful draping. Would love to know what the back of the gown looks like, especially since those straps are quite interesting.

FIDM Museum

Katrina, you are right in thinking that the wearer of this dress would "wriggle into it." There are no fasteners or zippers at all!

Ingrid, take a look at the 3rd photo in this post, as that's actually the back of the dress. Let me know if you are unable to view it.

I agree with both of you...the straps make this dress even more appealing!

r4i

Hey like this one also..I have one dress like this design. I wore it on my friend's wedding last month. Nicely boutique management and I was looking really amazing praised by my husband..

bmw

Ah yes, the days before implants, when no support was needed in the first place. There used to be a teeny boutique in Costa Mesa called Rainbow Bridge in the early 70's. They specialized in that sort of air brush on more mass market type knit tops. Beautiful piece here.

bert keeter

Holly was an amazing talent and person! I was lucky to be her first design assistant when I graduated from Parson's!

She designed by her own rules! Holly was a rebel in fashion!

FIDM Museum

Bert, I bet you have a lot of stories about Holly! We'll be posting on another of her dresses sometime in the next few weeks, so stay tuned to our blog.

Helen

Holly was my godmother and I had the sincere pleasure of using her design room as a playground when we visted her factory in culver city as kids. She passed away when I was around 11 but I can still recall her vibrant spirit and rebellious streak. Her clothes tended to carry a soft yet outspoken tone that truly reflected her personality.

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