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October 26, 2010

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Bethanie

I think that intellectual property should be protected to some extent, including creative property. Our educational system requires us to identify quotes and authors in our research - the old school way of identifying an American interpretation of Monsier X could be fine tuned. Having said that, it's funny how the presumption was that haute couture would have to be toned down for the American mass market. On a recent visit to Paris, I was noticing that the majority of French women I saw walking around the better neighborhoods were wearing classic pieces that were well tailored and fit their bodies exactly, rather than looking mass produced and ill fitting. Individualization was in the accessories. I've seen more trendy, throwaway, overdone clothing on women/fashion victims of all ages in L.A. Maybe it's the provincial need to prove that we're onto a style and can one up the original? With the exception of one older woman who I saw decked out in head to toe (classic subdued) Chanel every morning heading to the local Metro stop, I didn't notice a lot of Parisiennes sporting in-your-face trends or obvious logo.

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