« Parfums Lucien Lelong: The Peter Fink Collection | Main | Giorgio di Sant' Angelo, Fall 1969 »

September 27, 2011

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a01156f47abbe970c015391e7edc5970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference A Step Ahead of the Competition:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

LaMangaLaManga

Great post and great find! Any idea how much the shoes cost back then?

Question: Would cost be a factor when the museum decide what and how much to purchase? i.e. operation budget only allows the museum to buy 6 items instead of 10.

I have also seen eBay auctions with sellers purporting that they are selling on behalf of museums clothing that are deemed not special enough to remain in the collection. Does the FIDM have similar practice in editing your museum collection?

Rachel

Hi there!

Sorry to be a bit slow in responding to your questions! Glad you enjoyed the post.

First off, I checked with Kevin and we don't have a sense of what the price is. Certainly, as they were top-of-the-line Vivier, they would have been pricey.

Cost is certainly a factor in purchasing objects. Our curators have a running list of specific items (or categories, like sportswear) needed to round out our collection. If something on this list becomes available, we go for it. Of course, there are occasionally pieces that become available and don't fit a particular category. In some cases, the item will be SO GOOD we can't pass it up. It's really about prioritizing what is important to the collection, while also trying to allow for some flexibility. It's really not unlike a personal/household budget.

All museums deaccession objects from time to time; we have done so in the past. Rather than thinking of deaccessioned items as less-then, it's more productive to think of deaccessioning in terms of working to fulfill the mission statement of the particular institution.

When you see an auctioneer indicating that garments come from a specific museum, these items have been deaccessioned from the collection. The dealer isn't selling on behalf of the museum, but has acquired the object/s and is re-selling them.

Hope this answers your questions!

LaMangaLaManga

Rachel,

Thank you for your detailed answers!
It's nice to learn something new.

Elle

Connie Fischer

Those shoes are gorgeous. What fun it would be just to try them on. So happy to see how well-preserved they are.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.