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October 31, 2013

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p bargar

...just curious as to the kind of thread used for sewing in the cards...and what size were they, since playing cards have changed some over time...

Rachel

Unfortunately, Holt’s description of the fabulous black and red Monte Carlo costume seen here describes only the components. Author Ardern Holt assumed that her readers were either in a position to hire a skilled seamstress, or were able to sew. Generally speaking, most women had enough basic competence in sewing that would have allowed them to create a costume based on these descriptions, which mostly center on adding elements to skirts or bodices of specific color.

Holt’s vagueness on the construction details is typical of 19th century sewing instructions found in women's magazines like Godey's. That said, you’d definitely need very sturdy thread to sew playing cards to fabric! In this day and age, most people would probably use a glue gun rather than a needle and thread.

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